State Tests

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction's Accountability Services Division designs and manages statewide assessments that are administered to students enrolled in public and charter schools in grades 3–12. These assessments serve several purposes for the schools, the state, and federal guidelines.  

Beginning-of-Grade 3 (BOG3) Reading Test

Beginning-of-Grade 3 (BOG3) Reading Test

  • The BOG3 Reading Test is aligned to the North Carolina Standard Course of Study (NCSCoS) for grade 3 English Language Arts.
  • The purpose of the test is to establish a baseline measure of beginning third-grade students’ reading skills.
  • Students read authentic selections and then answer questions related to the selections.
  • Knowledge of vocabulary is assessed indirectly through application and understanding of terms within the context of the selections and questions.
  • All test items are multiple-choice.
  • The BOG3 is administered by the 20th day of face-to-face instruction.

BOG3 Resources

End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments

End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments

  • The EOC assessments are available for Biology, English II, NC Math 1, and NC Math 3. Students enrolled for credit in courses where EOC assessments are required must take the appropriate EOC assessment at the completion of the course.
  • The EOC assessments are aligned to the NCSCoS for English Language Arts and Mathematics and the North Carolina Essential Standards for Science.
  • All EOC assessments are required to be administered online. Exceptions to this rule are for approved technology hardship requests or for students with disabilities who have documented accommodations that dictate a paper/pencil test format is necessary for accessibility.
  • The online and paper/pencil English II assessments contain multiple-choice and constructed-response items.
  • The online and paper/pencil NC Math 1 assessment consists of two parts: calculator inactive and calculator active. Students may use a calculator only for the calculator active part of the test.
  • The online NC Math 1 and NC Math 3 assessments contain multiple-choice items, numeric entry items, and technology-enhanced items. The paper/pencil assessment consists of multiple-choice and gridded response items.
  • The NC Math 3 assessment contains only calculator active items.
  • The online Biology assessment questions are multiple-choice and technology-enhanced; the paper/pencil test questions are all multiple-choice.
  • Per SBE policy TEST-003, schools are to use results from all EOC assessments as at least twenty (20) percent of the student’s final grade for each respective course.
  • For the 2019–20 school year, all students enrolled in English II (the initial implementation year for this assessment), the schools shall adopt policies regarding the use of the assessment results in assigning final grades (TEST-003).

EOC Resources

End-of-Grade (EOG) Tests

End-of-Grade (EOG) Tests

Reading

  • The EOG Reading Tests are aligned to the NCSCoS for English Language Arts.
  • Students read authentic selections and then answer questions related to the selections.
  • Knowledge of vocabulary is assessed indirectly through application and understanding of terms within the context of the selections and questions.
  • All test items are multiple-choice.
  • The EOG testing window is the last ten (10) days of the school year.

Mathematics

  • The EOG Mathematics Tests are aligned to the NCSCoS for mathematics.
  • The EOG Mathematics Tests consist of two parts: calculator inactive and calculator active. Students are not allowed to use calculators during the calculator inactive part of the test; students are allowed to use calculators during the calculator active part of the test.
  • The EOG Mathematics Tests at grades 5 and 8 are required to be administered online. Exceptions to this rule are for approved technology hardship requests or for students with disabilities who have documented accommodations that dictate a paper/pencil test format is necessary for accessibility.
  • The tests at grades 3 and 4 contain multiple-choice items only.
  • The online tests at grades 5–8 contain multiple-choice and numeric entry items.
  • The paper/pencil tests at grades 5–8 contain multiple-choice and gridded-response items.
  • The EOG testing window is the last ten (10) days of the school year.

Science

  •  The EOG Science Tests at grades 5 and 8 are aligned to the North Carolina Essential Standards for Science.
  • The EOG Science Tests are required to be administered online. Exceptions to this rule are for approved technology hardship requests or for students with disabilities who have documented accommodations that dictate a paper/pencil test format is necessary for accessibility.
  • The online tests contain multiple-choice and technology-enhanced items.
  • The paper/pencil tests contain multiple-choice items only.
  • The EOG testing window is the last ten (10) instructional days of the school year.

EOG 3-8 Resources

NCEXTEND1 Alternate Assessment

NCEXTEND1 Alternate Assessment

  • The NCEXTEND1 is designed for students with disabilities who
    • have a current Individualized Education Program (IEP);
    • have a significant cognitive disability;
    • are instructed using the North Carolina Extended Content Standards (i.e., reading and mathematics) an the North Carolina Extended Essential Standards (i.e., science); and
    • are enrolled in grades 3–8, 10, or 11 according to PowerSchool.
  • The assessment process requires students to complete grade-level performance tasks.
  • Assessment items align with the North Carolina Extended Content Standards for Reading and Mathematics and the North Carolina Extended Essential Standards for Science.
  • The assessments are administered during designated state testing windows.
  • The NCEXTEND1 measures student performance in the following subject areas:
    • Reading at grades 3–8, 10, and 11;
    • Mathematics at grades 3–8, 10, and 11; and
    • Science at grades 5, 8, 10, and 11.

NCEXTEND1 Resources

PreACT®

PreACT®

  • The PreACT is administered to all tenth-graders.
  • The PreACT simulates the ACT testing experience by providing students early exposure to ACT test-quality questions. The PreACT is reported on the same 1–36 score scale as the ACT, but PreACT has a maximum score of 35. The PreACT also provides a predicted ACT composite score range.
  • The PreACT assessment includes four multiple-choice tests: English, math, reading, and science (not writing).
  • The PreACT is designed to help parents and educators identify areas where students may need additional academic support or remediation. The PreACT can also help to initiate strategic conversations between parents and schools regarding dual enrollment decisions, identifying curriculum gaps, implementing interventions on behalf of students, and choosing Advanced Placement classes.
ACT®

ACT®

  • Students at grade 11 take the ACT in the spring.
  • The ACT is a curriculum- and standards-based assessment that evaluates eleventh-graders’ general learning outcomes in English, Mathematics, Reading, Science, and Writing.
  • The ACT is used as a college admissions and placement test and is accepted by all four-year colleges and universities in the United States.
  • The English, Mathematics, Reading, and Science tests are multiple-choice tests.
  • The ACT Writing test complements the English test. The combined information from both tests tells postsecondary institutions about students' understanding of the conventions of standard written English and their ability to produce a direct sample of writing.
ACT WorkKeys®

ACT WorkKeys®

  • Students who are identified as Career and Technical Education (CTE) concentrators are required to complete the ACT WorkKeys assessments.
  • The three ACT WorkKeys assessments, which are the basis of the National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC), include Applied Math, Graphic Literacy, and Workplace Documents.
  • The Applied Math test measures critical thinking, mathematical reasoning, and problem-solving techniques for situations that occur in today’s workplace.
  • The Graphic Literacy test measures the skills needed to locate, synthesize, and use information from workplace graphics. Workplace graphics come in a variety of formats, but all communicate a level of information. From charts to graphs and diagrams to floor plans, identifying what information is being presented and understanding how to use it are critical to success.
  • The Workplace Documents test measures the skill people use when they read and use written texts such as memos, letters, directions, signs, notices, bulletins, policies, and regulations on the job. The assessment is defined through a combination of the test-complexity level of a reading passage and the skill elicited by the item.
  • Students who achieve qualifying scores on the Applied Math, Graphic Literacy, and Workplace Documents assessments can earn a North Carolina Career Readiness Certificate. The certificate provides employers with proof that students have the skills needed to do the jobs available.
College and Career Readiness Alternate Assessment Grade 10 (CCRAA 10)

College and Career Readiness Alternate Assessment Grade 10 (CCRAA 10)

  • The CCRAA 10 is designed as an alternate assessment for participation in the PreACT.
  • The CCRAA 10 is appropriate for students with disabilities enrolled in tenth grade who have an IEP and
    • exhibit severe and pervasive delays in all areas of conceptual, linguistic, and academic development as well as in adaptive behaviors, including communication, daily living skills, and self-care;
    • are following a course of study that, upon completing high school, may not lead to admission into a college-level course of study resulting in a college degree (i.e., the Occupational Course of Study);
    • are not receiving instruction in the North Carolina Extended Content Standards; and
    • have a written parental request for an alternate assessment or have the CCRAA indicated as the required assessment in their IEP.
  • The CCRAA 10 contains multiple-choice questions.
  • The CCRAA 10 is available in online and paper/pencil formats.
  • The administration of the CCRAA 10 occurs simultaneously with the PreACT administration in the fall.

CCRAA  Resources

College and Career Readiness Alternate Assessment Grade 11 (CCRAA 11)

College and Career Readiness Alternate Assessment Grade 11 (CCRAA 11)

  • The CCRAA 11 is designed as an alternate assessment for participation in the ACT.
  • The CCRAA 11 is appropriate for students enrolled in eleventh grade who have an IEP and
    • exhibit severe and pervasive delays in all areas of conceptual, linguistic, and academic development as well as in adaptive behaviors, including communication, daily living skills, and self-care;
    • are following a course of study that, upon completing high school, may not lead to admission into a college-level course of study resulting in a college degree (i.e., the Occupational Course of Study);
    • are not receiving instruction in the North Carolina Extended Content Standards
    • have a written parental request for an alternate assessment have the CCRAA indicated as the required assessment in their IEP.
  • The CCRAA 11 contains multiple-choice questions.
  • The CCRAA is available in online and paper/pencil formats.
  • The CCRAA 11 is administered during the spring ACT accommodations testing window.

CCRAA  Resources

Alternate ACCESS for ELLs®

Alternate ACCESS for ELLs®

  • The Alternate ACCESS for ELLs is an assessment of English language proficiency for students in grades 1–12 who are classified as English Learners (ELs) and have significant cognitive disabilities that prevent their meaningful participation in the ACCESS for ELLs assessment.
  • The Alternate ACCESS for ELLs has four assessment domains: Listening, Reading, Writing, and Speaking.
  • The Listening and Reading sections consist of multiple-choice questions.
  • The Writing and Speaking sections prompt the students for a constructed response.
  • All sections are adaptive, meaning that the test items are presented until the student reaches his/her performance “ceiling.”
  • Other unique features of the test include simplified language, repetition of questions, increased graphic support, larger testing materials, and graphics.
State-Identified Language Proficiency Testing

State-Identified Language Proficiency Testing

WIDA™ Screener and WIDA ACCESS Placement Test™ (W-APT™)

  • Language-minority students are identified through a home-language survey (HLS) process.
  • Eligibility for being assessed on the WIDA Screener at grades 1–12 or the W-APT at kindergarten is based on results of the HLS process.
  • The WIDA Screener or W-APT is administered to all eligible, initially enrolled, language-minority students (in kindergarten through grade 12) within thirty (30) calendar days.
  • All EL students must be annually assessed to determine progress and level of English language proficiency.
  • The WIDA Screener and W-APT are screeners that determine if the student is identified as EL. If the student is identified as an EL, the WIDA Screener and W-APT provide guidance concerning which tier (level) of English language proficiency test should be administered to the student. The score on the WIDA Screener and W-APT also determines eligibility for state EL testing accommodations.
  • The annual English language proficiency test, Assessing Comprehension and Communication in English State-to-State for English Language Learners (ACCESS for ELLs), is the state-designated EL proficiency test.
  • The Alternate ACCESS for ELLs is an assessment of English language proficiency for students in grades 1–12 who are identified as language minority students and have significant cognitive disabilities that prevent their meaningful participation in the ACCESS for ELLs assessment.
  • The WIDA Screener, W-APT, ACCESS for ELLs, and the Alternate ACCESS for ELLs consist of four subtests that assess the student’s English speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills.
  • All students identified as ELs must be administered the ACCESS for ELLs or its alternate assessment during the annual testing window.
  • The WIDA Screener and ACCESS for ELLs are required to be administered online.
  • The results from the annual administration of the ACCESS for ELLs are used to measure progress and proficiency of ELs in the English language.
National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

  • North Carolina participates in NAEP, also known as the Nation’s Report Card.
  • NAEP is the only nationally representative and continuing assessment of what America’s students know and can do in various subject areas.
  • Selected fourth-, eighth-, and twelfth-grade students participate in NAEP.
  • State-level results are reported for grades 4 and 8 in Mathematics, Reading, Science, and Writing. This allows comparisons among states and the nation.
  • Selected students at ages 9, 13 and 17 participate in NAEP Long-Term Trend (LTT) assessments that are administered every four years in mathematics and reading. Results are only reported at the national level. Measuring trends of student achievement or change over time requires the precise replication of past procedures. Therefore, the LTT instrument does not evolve based on changes in curricula or educational practices, unlike the main NAEP.
  • Selected twelfth-grade students participate in NAEP. Results for grade 12 are only reported at the national level.
  • NAEP has special studies and assessments that are established by the National Assessment Governing Board.

NAEP Resources